Pass the Curry Please...

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According to the medical community, about 2,000mg is the maximum amount of standardized turmeric curcumin you should take per day. When cooking with ground turmeric powder, the University of Maryland recommends 1 to 3 grams per day. One gram of ground turmeric powder is about ½ teaspoon.

So, if you love curry - eat up and enjoy! Or add this savory spice to an egg scramble, a soup, rice, a salad dressing, or your favorite vegetable.

Follow this link -  Bon Appetit Turmeric Recipes – for some great turmeric recipes!   

 

     Turmeric Tea Tonic

  •  1 tsp cinnamon
  •  pinch of clove
  •  pinch of nutmeg
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger (optional)
  • pinch of fresh ground black pepper
  • As much turmeric as you can handle! Start with a teaspoon and go up from there.
  • 1-2 cups of water
  • Raw honey to sweeten
  • Milk or milk substitute of choice (coconut, hemp, almond, etc)

Simmer herbs and water for 15 minutes, strain out and add honey and milk to taste. Sprinkle with cinnamon.
 


Another excellent way to reap the benefits of this wonder spice is our own curcu-gel® by Nature’s Edge!

Our curcu-gel® uses BCM-95®**,  a patent pending Curcuminoids Complex with both enhanced bioavailability and sustained retention time in the body. The result is a powerful Curcumin supplement whose bioavailability in a recent human study was found to be more than eight (8) times higher compared to standard commercial curcumin.*  

*http://www.arjunanatural.com/bcm95.html  *https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2792534/

**BCM-95® is a registered trademark of Dolcas-Biotech, LLC.

Turmeric is a spice that comes from the turmeric plant. It has been used in India for thousands of years as a spice and medicinal herb. You probably know turmeric as the main spice in curry. It has a warm, bitter taste and is frequently used to flavor or color curry powders, mustards, butters, and cheeses. But the root of turmeric is also used widely to make medicine. It contains a yellow-colored chemical called curcumin, it is the main active ingredient in turmeric. Curcumin has powerful anti-inflammatory effects and is a very strong antioxidant.

Recently, science has started to back up what the Indians have known for a long time - that it really does contain compounds with medicinal properties (1). Curcumin targets multiple steps in the inflammatory pathway, at the molecular level. Curcumin blocks NF-kB, a molecule that travels into the nuclei of cells and turns on genes related to inflammation. NF-kB is believed to play a major role in many chronic diseases (23). Inflammation is extremely complicated and the key takeaway here is that curcumin is a bioactive substance that fights inflammation at the molecular level (456).


               CURCUMIN'S MANY BENEFITS

  • Acts as a powerful anti-inflammatory
  • A good antioxidant
  • Enhances heart health
  • Brain boosting
  • May be helpful for fighting diabetes
  • Inhibits the of formation of LDL (bad) cholesterol
  • Helpful for arthritis
  • Supports the kidneys and liver

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***A portion of all sales from the anti-inflammation line will be donated to the Arthritis Foundation.

THIS INFORMATION HAS NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.


*Disclaimer: This is a BLOG, which contains opinions and does not reflect the opinion or official message of Nature’s Edge®. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. These terms and conditions of use are subject to change at any time and without notice.

In Honor of Diabetes Alert Day

84.1 MILLION AMERICANS
have prediabetes

1.5 MILLION AMERICANS 20+ YEARS OLD
are diagnosed with diabetes every year

193,000 AMERICANS 19 OR YOUNGER
have type 1 or type 2 diabetes

YIKES!

While those numbers above may be scary, the most concerning number I saw on the American Diabetes Association’s website was 90%. That represents the number of those 84.1 million who do not know they have diabetes!

How is that possible?!

Often diabetes presents with no symptoms. Sometimes it slowly develops over many years with subtle warning signs. There are factors that could put you at greater risk for getting diabetes, and knowing these along with paying attention to symptoms could help you get diagnosed so you can manage blood glucose carefully if necessary.

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What are the risk factors?

Children, young adults and those with an immediate relative diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes are in the highest risk category for Type 1 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes affects a greater population, and there are several more risk factors including but not limited to being over the age of 45, being overweight, sedentary lifestyle, smoking, family history of diabetes, high blood pressure, abnormal triglyceride or HDL levels, etc.

For more information on the process of diagnosing diabetes, the American Diabetes Association can be a great resource.

In addition to physical activity and a concentrated effort with diet, supplements make a great addition to the health routine of a diabetic or pre-diabetic. Nature’s Edge offers three, specially formulated options to support the body in regulation insulin:

1.) alpha lipoic acid

  • Antioxidant protection against free radicals that can damage cells, organs, and tissue
  • Helps improve insulin sensitivity
  • Promotes glucose metabolism, potentially lowering blood sugar levels
  • Promotes cellular health and is well tolerated
  • Studies show that alpha lipoic acid improves diabetic nerve damage symptoms  

2.) citramag®

  • Improves overall metabolic profile
  • Has a beneficial effect on insulin resistance
  • Helps promote healthy insulin production
  • Replenishes magnesium that is depleted by diabetic medications
  • Supports lowering blood pressure and assists in fighting inflammation

 3.) nac

  • Free radical protection; a powerful antioxidant
  • Replenishes glutathione (the body's principal antioxidant that neutralizes free radicals and detoxifies harmful substances) which is often deficient with age and in chronic illness
  • Improves insulin sensitivity
  • Helps support cellular health and liver function 
  • Protects and supports a healthy respiratory and immune system
  • Delays muscle fatigue and accelerates muscle growth

*A portion of all sales from the diabetes support line will be donated to the American Diabetes Association.

 


*Disclaimer: This is a BLOG, which contains opinions and does not reflect the opinion or official message of Nature’s Edge®. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. These terms and conditions of use are subject to change at any time and without notice.

 

What's Up Doc?!

 
 First Woman Doctor in USA - Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910)

First Woman Doctor in USA - Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910)

 

In honor of Women’s History Month, we thought we would celebrate America’s first female doctor. Meet Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman to graduate from medical school in the United States. In 1821 Elizabeth was born in England but at age 11 her father moved their family to New York City for financial reasons and because her father wanted to help abolish slavery. Accordingly, after his death in 1838 his children, including Elizabeth, would continue to campaign for women’s rights and support the anti-slavery movement.  

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While in her mid-20s, Blackwell had a friend suffering from a terminal disease who had felt embarrassed going to male doctors, lamenting that she would have fared better having a female physician. Deeply affected by her friend's words and struggling with an affair of the heart as well, Blackwell opted to pursue a career in medicine. But the road to becoming a doctor was not an easy one. As some other women did at the time, she studied independently with doctors before getting accepted in 1847 to Geneva Medical College in upstate New York. Her acceptance was deemed by the student body as an administrative practical joke.

Two years later, in 1849, Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman to receive an M.D. degree from an American medical school. She worked in clinics in London and Paris for two years and studied midwifery at La Maternité where she contracted ophthalmia neonatorum from a young patient. When Blackwell lost sight in one eye, she returned to New York City in 1851, giving up her dream of becoming a surgeon.

Blackwell returned to Europe and worked in London and Paris. She focused on midwifery at La Maternité, where she contracted a disease during a procedure on an infant that left her blind in one eye; making her unable to practice surgery as she had wished. Blackwell later returned to New York City and established a private practice, at first struggling financially again due to the prejudices of the day. She applied for a job as physician at the women's department of a large city dispensary but was refused. In 1853, with the help of friends, she opened her own dispensary in a single rented room, seeing patients three afternoons a week. The dispensary was incorporated in 1854 and moved to a small house she bought on 15th Street. Her sister, Dr. Emily Blackwell, joined her in 1856 and, together with Dr. Marie Zakrzewska, they opened the New York Infirmary for Women and Children at 64 Bleecker Street in 1857. This institution and its medical college for women (opened 1867) provided training and experience for women doctors and medical care for the poor.

Soon after establishing the college, Elizabeth Blackwell returned to England. She set up private practice and served as a lecturer at the London School of Medicine for Women. She eventually moved to Hastings, England. Elizabeth Blackwell died at her home there on May 31, 1910. A grand visionary who created opportunities for female physicians of the future, Blackwell published several books over the course of her career, including her 1895 autobiography Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women.

Visit this website for more reading on Dr. Blackwell and other amazing women of history:   AWH - all the kick-ass women history books left out!

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*Disclaimer: This is a BLOG, which contains opinions and does not reflect the opinion or official message of Nature’s Edge®. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. These terms and conditions of use are subject to change at any time and without notice.

Stress, Stress Go Away!

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Let’s face it, too much stress is bad for the heart. Stress is a contributing factor to many, if not all health problems, but since it is Heart Month, let’s focus on how it affects the heart and how we can learn to fight stress.

If you're often stressed, and you don't have good ways to manage it, you are more likely to have high blood pressure, higher cholesterol levels, damage to your arteries, chest pain, irregular heartbeats, or the development and progression of coronary artery disease. Studies have linked stress to changes in the way blood clots, which makes a heart attack more likely.

The way you handle stress also matters. If you respond to it in unhealthy ways -- such as smoking, drinking alcohol, overeating, or not exercising -- that makes matters worse. On the other hand, if you exercise, connect with people, and find meaning despite the stress, that makes a difference in your emotions and in your body.

There is much truth in the old Chinese proverb - “When the heart is at ease, the body is healthy.”

Top 10 Emergency Stress-Stoppers from the AHA

Emergency stress stoppers are actions to help you defuse stress in the moment. You may need different stress stoppers for different situations, and sometimes it helps to combine them. Here are some ideas:

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1.     Count to 10 before you speak or react.

2.     Take a few slow, deep breaths until you feel your body un-clench a bit.

3.     Go for a walk, even if it’s just to the restroom and back. It can help break the tension and give you a chance to think things through.

4.     Try a quick meditation or prayer to get some perspective.

5.     If it’s not urgent, sleep on it and respond tomorrow. This works especially well for stressful emails and social media trolls.

6.     Walk away from the situation for a while and handle it later once things have calmed down.

7.     Break down big problems into smaller parts. Take one step at a time, instead of trying to tackle everything at once.

8.     Turn on some chill music or an inspirational podcast to help you deal with road rage.

9.     Take a break to pet the dog, hug a loved one or do something to help someone else.

10. Work out or do something active. Movement and exercise is a great antidote for stress.


*Disclaimer: This is a BLOG, which contains opinions and does not reflect the opinion or official message of Nature’s Edge®. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. These terms and conditions of use are subject to change at any time and without notice.

Valentine's Day, Love and a Healthy Heart

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Love is so vital to the health of our heart, our body, our mind, and our soul. Every thought we have, every feeling we feel causes “an instantaneous cascade of hundreds, if not thousands, of neuropeptides and hormones that orchestrate a symphony of positive and negative effects within the body. That is why it is so important to pay close attention to the thoughts and emotions that are running through your mind, as they dictate the symphony of neurotransmitters playing in your body.”1

As we explore cardiovascular health, our emotional and spiritual heart is just as important as our physical heart, and care must be given to the whole.

Holistic health practitioner and Los Angeles cardiologist, Cynthia Thaik, M.D., offers a unique approach to the art and science of your heart. The following is from her My Healthy Lifestyle Blog and offers us so much more on the LOVE and HEALTHY HEART connection.

Ways That Love Benefits Your Health:

1.     Love improves self-esteem, which leads to better self-care. Self-love is key because when you love yourself, you are much more likely to engage in activities that contribute to better nutrition and physical fitness, and less likely to make unhealthy lifestyle choices.

2.     Love is a great antidote to stress. Love counteracts the fight-or-flight response that we so often find ourselves in. Even low levels of stress cause the body to release cortisol, which is associated with an increased risk of developing high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and depression. Love downregulates the production of cortisol. Love encourages your body to produce oxytocin, the “feel-good” or “love” hormone. Oxytocin can reduce cardiovascular stress and improve the immune system, which in turn decreases cell death and inflammation. Love also causes the production in your brain of norepinephrine and dopamine (both hormones associated with adrenaline), which leads to increased feelings of joy and pleasure. Love really is your best medicine.

3.     Love decreases anxiety and staves off depression, which subsequently reduces the signs and symptoms of heart disease. In his book Love and Survival: Eight Pathways to Intimacy and Health, Dean Ornish, M.D describes one study where married men who suffered from angina (chest pains) experienced far less angina if they felt loved by their wives, even despite high risk factors like high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and diabetes.

4.     Love decreases inflammation, improves your immune system, and can be a potent pain reliever. A recent study from the Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research at Ohio State University College of Medicine showed that people who are lonely develop more reactivation of latent viruses than those that are well connected. Possible mechanisms for these actions include increased release of cytokines, better relaxation and the release of endorphins

5.     Sleeping next to someone you love makes you feel more relaxed, which helps you to sleep better. Numerous studies have linked the benefits to the feel-good hormone oxytocin. Adequate rest is vital to heart health and overall well-being, as much of the reparative work of the body is done during sleep.

Not just at Valentine’s Day, but all year around, it is important to remind yourself that there is so much more to love than just romantic love. There is love of life, love of nature, love of animals, love of others, and love of self, and all of these acts of love provide amazing health benefits.

Ways to Incorporate Love Into Your Life

1.     Be more loving and giving. Bring happiness and joy into other people’s lives. Be generous with your time and money; be a person of increase. You can do this through volunteerism and altruism. I challenge everyone to do one random act of kindness today, even if it is as simple as smiling at someone.

2.     Hug often and hold hands. Physical contact in a loving and nurturing way has the ability to instantly improve your mood, lower stress levels and put you at ease. Try to hug at least one person you love every day.

3.     Be more playful in your loving relationship and make love often. Remind your partner about how much you care for them, and make time for them, no matter how busy you are.

4.     Love life — bring more joy into your life each day. Flirt with life... laugh, dance, sing. One way to manifest this is to allow yourself to really laugh without holding anything back and simply enjoy this pure laughter.

5.     Love yourself and be kind to yourself today. Treat yourself like you would another person who you are truly in love with. The more you love yourself, the better equipped you will be to love others. And the more love you give, the more you will receive.

 

1Dr. Cynthia Thaik, Love Heals! The Blog, 5/7/2013


 

*Disclaimer: This is a BLOG, which contains opinions and does not reflect the opinion or official message of Nature’s Edge®. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. These terms and conditions of use are subject to change at any time and without notice.

An Abundance of Heart

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In celebration of American Heart Month this February, we are bringing the heart front and center! The heart is our hardest working muscle, and if we do not properly care for it, it will give out on us. In fact, many sources confirm that the leading cause of death in the United States is heart disease. Luckily, heart disease is also one of the most preventable diseases.

So what is heart disease anyway? In its simplest terms, heart disease refers to several conditions that can include diseased or clotted vessels and structural problems. Arrhythmia, cardiac arrest, congestive heart failure and even something as common as high blood pressure all belong to this category.

What are the risk factors? According to the American Heart Association, risk factors are sorted into three categories: 1.) Major risk factors, 2.) Modifiable risk factors and 3.) Contributing risk factors. Major risk factors can be discounted for now, because we cannot do anything about those. Let’s focus on modifiable and contributing risk factors.

How can you decrease your risk?

*Put down that cigarette! Smokers have a much higher risk of having heart problems later.

* Eat clean and healthy! High cholesterol, triglycerides and being overweight all contribute to a high risk factor.

*Get moving! According to the New York State Health Department, physical inactivity accounts for 35% of coronary hear disease death. The American Heart Association recommends a minimum of 150 minutes moderate exercise per week or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week to decrease your risk of heart disease.

*Limit alcohol consumption! Over-drinking can increase blood pressure, stroke, cancer and contribute to high triglycerides, obesity and many other problems. While some research states that red wine can be beneficial for the heart, it limits that amount to two glasses of wine per day for men and one for women. As much as we can all appreciate a good pour, one glass of wine is defined as 5 fl oz.

*Lower that stress! Several studies mention that the body’s response to stress can be a contributing factor of heart disease.

Now where do you turn? The American Heart Association has the Healthy For Good Initiative, which outlines several ways to make changes in the modifiable areas. There are also several, known studies on how different supplements can boost heart health (see links below). Nature’s Edge offers four different, superior-absorption supplements to help you maintain a healthy heart!

*A portion of all supplements geared towards cardiovascular health will go to support the American Heart Association.

Resources:

Benefits of CoQ10: https://www.drsinatra.com/why-coq10-can-literally-save-your-life
American Heart Association Home: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/
Omegas and Heart Health: http://time.com/4619488/omega-3-fats-heart-health/
Phytosterols and heart health: http://usmle.biochemistryformedics.com/the-role-of-phytosterols-in-reducing-the-risk-of-heart-disease/


*Disclaimer: This is a BLOG, which contains opinions and does not reflect the opinion or official message of Nature’s Edge®. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. These terms and conditions of use are subject to change at any time and without notice.

Welcome to Hydration Station

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The human body is roughly 60% water weight. For this reason, many of us can lose a few pounds by simply going to the bathroom or sweating it out at exercise class, but being the majority of our body weight, water is hugely important to our functioning as humans! So,  do you know exactly what water does in the body and what happens when you are dehydrated?

Let’s start with some of the many functions of water in the body:

What can water do for you?
*Regulate body temperature through mechanisms like sweating
*Protect body tissues
*Act as lubricant for joints and the spinal cord
*Help flush waste through kidneys and liver
*Assist with digestion (hello, spit!)
*SO MUCH MORE!

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What can happen when you are dehydrated?
*Dry skin
*Dizziness
*Fatigue
*Thirst and dry mouth
*Headaches
*Lack of concentration
*Irritability

According to CBS Miami, up to 75% of Americans may suffer from chronic dehydration! That’s a lot, especially considering how many sources of hydration exist. For those of you who claim to not like water, there are other hydrating alternatives to plain water. Flavored water, sparkling water, coconut water, maple water and many fruits and vegetables can be great to help you achieve daily hydration goals! In fact, many athletes use a combination of plain water and coconut or maple water to mix things up when trying to replenish water lost through activity.

If you are one of the 75%, start with the simple goal to drink a full glass of water with your vitamins. Happy Hydrating!


*Disclaimer: This is a BLOG, which contains opinions and does not reflect the opinion or official message of Nature’s Edge®. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. These terms and conditions of use are subject to change at any time and without notice.

Meditate and Feel Great

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In the interest of feeling good did you ever consider a daily mediation ritual? Or have you tried meditating and promptly concluded that you don’t know how, you can’t quiet your mind enough, you think about all kinds of things too much, you fidget too much, the list goes on of why we can’t meditate.

Studies have shown that meditation can reduce stress and improve health. A simple technique practiced for as few as 10 minutes per day can help you control stress, decrease anxiety, improve cardiovascular health, and achieve a greater capacity for relaxation.

Again, in the interest of feeling better and assisting your overall health let’s take another look at the practice of mediation, shall we? Go back to the adage, ‘practice makes perfect’ or in this case, practice makes a healthy habit! Wherever you are on the meditation scale – never tried it or tried it but didn’t like it, or just can’t find the time – give it a go, surrender 10-15 minutes of your day and experiment with different techniques and most importantly, go easy on yourself.                                                                      

                                              BE EASY. BREATHE. GO WITH THE FLOW. RELAX.

Meditation is about breathing and focusing on your breath so that your thoughts can take a break. Slow your whole mind/body down to get in touch with a beautiful rhythm that can take you on a remarkable journey – perhaps of healing, renewal or simply, peace.

I have meditated on and off for many, many years. I was introduced to transcendental meditation [ https://www.tm.org/ ] at the age of 11. I must confess that I feel better and life is just easier when I make it a daily practice (15 min for me). I have included a few links here to help you get started or reboot yourself in the healthful practice of meditation.

 

http://www.healthandfitnesstravel.com/blog/8-reasons-why-meditation-is-good-for-your-health

https://zenhabits.net/meditation-guide/

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/11/08/guided-meditation-relaxation_n_4235832.html

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/gallery/2011/jan/22/how-to-meditate-ten-steps-headspace

https://chopra.com/articles/learn-to-meditate-in-6-easy-steps#sm.0000sgnvy9j4sdtcxpo1bare6bi5v


*Disclaimer: This is a BLOG, which contains opinions and does not reflect the opinion or official message of Nature’s Edge®. All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information on this site or found by following any link on this site. The owner will not be liable for any errors or omissions in this information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. These terms and conditions of use are subject to change at any time and without notice.